Find a Clinical Trial

There are many clinical trials for type 1 diabetes currently recruiting. Find one in your area now.

It’s easier than you think to help find ways to cure, prevent and treat type 1 diabetes.

Researchers all over Australia are running clinical trials for type 1 diabetes. If you would like to participate or learn more about one of these trials, use our clinical trial finder below.

These are the current clinical trials in your Australian state and in New Zealand. If none of these are suited to you at this point, sign up to become a T1D Game Changer, and we’ll keep you updated as to when new trial opportunities arise.

Researchers: Submit your clinical research project on our trial finder.

Trial Finder

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)

Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Canberra Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

  • Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
  • Have previously had a positive antibody test

For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019.

Nox 1/4 Inhibition to Treat Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
This study will test whether a new tablet can help to treat diabetic kidney disease. The study will last for 56 weeks, and participants will be allocated to receive either the new tablet or placebo. There will be 10 study visits. The study led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute (Prof Jonathan Shaw) and recruiting patients from Royal North Shore Hospital and Hunter Diabetes Centre in NSW.

The study, funded by the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting adults (18-70 years) with T1D, with HbA1c<10%, and with albumin (protein) in the urine.

The study has been approved by the South Metropolitan Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12617001187336.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at:

For more information click here.

The Fenofibrate and Microvascular Events in Type 1 DiabetIc Retinopathy (FAME-1-EYE) Study
The FAME-1-Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in T1D. The study led by the Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney (Prof Alicia Jenkins) and recruiting patients from multiple sites in NSW: Royal Prince Alfred Hospital (RPAH), Royal North Shore Hospital (RNSH), Concord Repatriation General hospital, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Southwest Retina, Hunter Diabetes Centre and Prince of Wales Hospital (POWH), NSW.
The study, funded by JDRF, the T1DCRN and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is currently recruiting adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy.

The study has been approved by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000249954.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre.

Email: fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Phone: 1800 158 629

For more information click here.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from the Children’s Hospital at Westmead (Sydney, NSW) and the John Hunter Children’s Hospital (Newcastle, NSW)

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the ADDN study coordinator:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from the Westmead Hospital, Campbelltown Hospital, Royal North Shore Hospital and Newcastle Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

  • Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
  • Have previously had a positive antibody test

For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Cord Reinfusion in Diabetes (CORD) Pilot Study

Cell Care is partnering with The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, New South Wales, in a world–first study investigating the potential of cord blood to prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in children at high risk of developing the disease.

The CORD study is currently recruiting children between 1 and 14 years of age who are at high risk of developing T1D – where a parent, sibling or other close family members (1st or 2nd degree relatives) have T1D. The study is available to families who have stored cord blood or who are currently expecting a baby and planning cord blood storage.

If you have a family history of Type 1 diabetes and are expecting a child, you can request your cord blood and tissue information pack here.

For more information about the CORD study contact the CORD Study coordinator/nurse at The Children’s Hospital Westmead;
Email: SCHN-CHW-CORD@health.nsw.gov.au
Phone: (02) 9845 3512

The CORD study has been approved by the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Register: ACTRN12613000186752

Is dysfunction of brain blood vessels associated with cognitive impairment in type 1 diabetes? (INeuroT1D)
The study group’s goal is to estimate the contributions of age and diabetes-specific brain changes observed in older age T1D. Namely, they aim to evaluate cerebral blood vessel function and blood flow as well as hearing control and their relationships with how well the brain performs during mental tasks, and if type 1 diabetes can impact this performance in later life, when compared to non-diabetic participants.

Inclusion criteria: Age 30-80 years, T1D diagnosed before 18 years, No advanced T1D complications such as blindness or deafness, Not hospitalised for severe glycemic events in the last 3 months, No liver or kidney disease, No malignant cancer, Not pregnant, No neurological conditions including stroke, TIA, major depression, multiple sclerosis, parkinson’s disease, dementia or mild cognitive impairment.

The INeuroT1D study is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Register: ACTRN12618000496213

For more information about the INeuroT1D study contact the Study coordinator at University of Newcastle NSW.

Email: rachel.wong@newcastle.edu.au
Phone: (02) 4921 6408

INTIMET: INsulin Resistance in Type 1 Diabetes Managed with METformin
Harmful patterns of insulin resistance in the muscle and liver may be an explanation for increased cardiovascular disease in T1D. The INTIMET study is a detailed investigation of insulin resistance in T1D and will test if metformin can improve insulin action in muscle and liver. Participants will be asked to take metiformin (or placebo tablets) and are required to attend 4 appointments over 6 months at the Garvan Institute.

The study is led by Prof Jerry R Greenfield from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, A/Prof Jane Holmes-Walker and Dr Jennifer Snaith from Westmead Hospital. The study is currently recruiting adults (20-50 years old) with T1D (at least 10 years since diagnosis and have a HbA1c ≤ 9.5%).

The study has been approved by the St. Vincent’s Hospital HREC and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12619001440112

For more information about the study contact Dr Jennifer Snaith at Garvan:

Email: INTIMET@garvan.org.au

Phone: 0491731769

Updated December 2019

Pathway to Prevention Study to prevent Type 1 Diabetes
Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by the Benaroya Research Institute (Seattle, USA) has multiple sites around Australia recruiting patients.

The study, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

are between the ages of 2.5 and 45 years and have a parent, brother/sister, or child with T1D
are between the ages of 2.5 and 20 years and have an aunt/uncle, cousin, grandparent, niece/nephew, or half-brother/sister with T1D
have not been diagnosed with diabetes
The study is listed on the clinicaltrials.gov registry: NCT00097292

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research. The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from The Lady Cilento Children’s Hospital, Brisbane, QLD

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at Royal Melbourne Hospital:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Brisbane Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
Have previously had a positive antibody test
For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019

Nox Inhibition to Treat Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
This study will test whether a new tablet can help to treat diabetic kidney disease. The study will last for 56 weeks, and participants will be allocated to receive either the new tablet or placebo. There will be 10 study visits. The study led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute (Prof Jonathan Shaw) and recruiting patients from Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA.

The study, funded by the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting adults (18-70years) with T1D, with HbA1c<10%, and with albumin (protein) in the urine.

The study has been approved by the South Metropolitan Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12617001187336.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at Royal Adelaide Hospital

Email: Health.CALHNResearchGovernance@sa.gov.au

For more information click here.

The Fenofibrate and Microvascular Events in Type 1 DiabetIc Retinopathy (FAME-1-EYE) Study
The FAME-1-Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in T1D. The study led by the Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney (Prof Alicia Jenkins) and recruiting patients from the Repatriation General Hospital and the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

The study, funded by JDRF, the T1DCRN and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is currently recruiting adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy.

The study has been approved by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000249954.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre.

Email: fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Phone: 1800 158 629

For more information click here.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from the Women and Children’s Hospital Adelaide and Lyell McEwin and Modbury Hospitals, Adelaide, SA.

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the ADDN study coordinator:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Adelaide Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
Have previously had a positive antibody test
For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019

Pathway to Prevention Study to prevent Type 1 Diabetes
Family members of people with type 1 diabetes are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by the Benaroya Research Institute (Seattle, USA) has multiple sites around Australia recruiting patients.

The study, funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

are between the ages of 2.5 and 45 years and have a parent, brother/sister, or child with T1D
are between the ages of 2.5 and 20 years and have an aunt/uncle, cousin, grandparent, niece/nephew, or half-brother/sister with T1D
have not been diagnosed with diabetes
The study is listed on the clinicaltrials.gov registry: NCT00097292

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019

Nox Inhibition to Treat Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
This study will test whether a new tablet can help to treat diabetic kidney disease. The study will last for 56 weeks, and participants will be allocated to receive either the new tablet or placebo. There will be 10 study visits. The study led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute (Prof Jonathan Shaw) and recruiting patients from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, The Alfred Hospital, Monash Health, The Austin Hospital, St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Barwon Health and Western Health.

The study, funded by the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting adults (18-70years) with T1D, with HbA1c<10%, and with albumin (protein) in the urine.

The study has been approved by the South Metropolitan Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12617001187336.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute:

Maria Lawton
T +61 3 8532 1835
E Maria.Lawton@baker.edu.au

For more information click here.

The Fenofibrate and Microvascular Events in Type 1 Diabetic Retinopathy (FAME-1-EYE) Study
The FAME-1-Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in T1D. The study led by the Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney (Prof Alicia Jenkins) and recruiting patients from St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute and University Hospital Geelong.

The study, funded by JDRF, the T1DCRN and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is currently recruiting adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy.

The study has been approved by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000249954.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre.

Email: fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Phone: 1800 158 629

For more information click here.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from The Royal Children’s Hospital, Melbourne, Monash Children’s Hospital, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, St Vincent’s Hospital and Sunshine Hospital, Melbourne, VIC.

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the ADDN study coordinator:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Royal Melbourne Hospital and Monash Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
Have previously had a positive antibody test
For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Hydroxychloroquine in Individuals At-risk for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
This study is testing a medication, called hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) to assess safety and effectiveness to prevent individuals at risk of type 1 diabetes (T1D) from progressing to type 1 diabetes.

HCQ is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a treatment for malaria, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis. HCQ has been used extensively for treatment of autoimmune disease in adults, children, and during pregnancy. This medication has not previously been studied as a treatment to prevent T1D.

The goal of this study is to learn if HCQ can help prevent or delay progression from normal glucose tolerance (Stage 1) to abnormal glucose tolerance (Stage 2) or type 1 diabetes (Stage 3). The study involves 5 visits in the first 6 months, then 1 visit every 6 months for the remainder of the study.

The study led by National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) (Carla Greenbaum, MD) is currently recruiting patients from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, VIC.

The study is listed on the clinicaltrials.gov registry here.

For more information click here.

Updated December 2019

Nox Inhibition to Treat Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
This study will test whether a new tablet can help to treat diabetic kidney disease. The study will last for 56 weeks, and participants will be allocated to receive either the new tablet or placebo. There will be 10 study visits. The study led by the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute (Prof Jonathan Shaw) and recruiting patients from Fremantle Hosptial, WA.

The study, funded by the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting adults (18-70years) with T1D, with HbA1c<10%, and with albumin (protein) in the urine.

The study has been approved by the South Metropolitan Health Service Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12617001187336.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute:

Maria Lawton
T +61 3 8532 1835
E Maria.Lawton@baker.edu.au

For more information click here.

The Fenofibrate and Microvascular Events in Type 1 DiabetIc Retinopathy (FAME-1-EYE) Study
The FAME-1-Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in T1D. The study led by the Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney (Prof Alicia Jenkins) and recruiting patients from Fremantle Hospital, WA.

The study, funded by JDRF, the T1DCRN and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is currently recruiting adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy.

The study has been approved by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000249954.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre.

Email: fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Phone: 1800 158 629

For more information click here.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from Perth Children’s Hospitala and Fiona Stanley Hospital, Perth, WA.

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the ADDN study coordinator:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Princess Margaret Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
Have previously had a positive antibody test
For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

Updated December 2019

Type1Screen: Screening for Type 1 Diabetes (T1D)
Family members of people with T1D are at increased risk of developing the disease. This risk can be clarified using a blood test for antibodies, which are found in around 1 in 30 family members. Those with antibodies are offered opportunities to participate in trials of therapies to prevent them ever getting diabetes. The study led by Dr John Wentworth and Dr Peter Colman at The Royal Melbourne Hospital and recruiting from Auckland Hospital and Dunedin Hospital.

The study in collaboration with JDRF, is currently recruiting children and adults who are:

Aged between 2-30 years old and with a relative diagnosed with T1D
Have previously had a positive antibody test
For more information about the study, contact the study coordinator here.

The Australasian Diabetes Data Network (ADDN)
ADDN connects real-time diabetes data about thousands of type 1 diabetes patients from specialist centres across on a single platform that allows for a long-term monitoring of diabetes outcomes and participation in clinical research.

The study co-led by the Australasian Paediatric Endocrine Group (APEG) and the Australia Data Society (ADS) is recruiting patients from Starship Children’s Hospital and Dunedin Public Hospital.

The study, funded by the JDRF and the T1DCRN, is currently recruiting children and adults with T1D.

The study has been approved by the Hunter New England Human Research Ethics Committee.

For more information about the study contact the ADDN study coordinator:

Email: info@addn.org.au

For more information click here.

The Fenofibrate and Microvascular Events in Type 1 DiabetIc Retinopathy (FAME-1-EYE) Study
The FAME-1-Eye Study is investigating whether fenofibrate, a drug that is already on the market to lower cholesterol and blood fats, can slow or reverse eye damage and other complications in adults with T1D. We know that fenofibrate improves blood fats and slows the progression of eye damage in people with type 2 diabetes, this study will see if it has the same effect in T1D. The study led by the Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney (Prof Alicia Jenkins) and recruiting patients from Auckland Diabetes Centre and Christchurch Hospital.

The study, funded by JDRF, the T1DCRN and the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is currently recruiting adults with T1D and non-proliferative retinopathy.

The study has been approved by the Northern Sydney Local Health District Human Research Ethics Committee and is listed on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register (ANZCTR): ACTRN12611000249954.

For more information about the study contact the study coordinator at NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre.

Email: fame1eye@ctc.usyd.edu.au

Phone: 1800 158 629

For more information click here.

Updated December 2019

Photo: The Salmon family of New South Wales. Max (age 6) was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2010.

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